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Pulmonary Pharmacology:
better breathing through chemistry

October 27-29th 2014

Kennett Square, PA

Meeting Held: New Bolton Center, University of Pennsylvania
Room Block: Hilton Garden Inn, Kennett Square, PA
Room Rate: $129 single/double. Mention group code TUFTS.

The Veterinary Comparative Respiratory Society, VCRS, will host an exciting and informative conference on Pulmonary Pharmacology: Better Breathing Through Chemistry with Program Director Rose Nolen-Walston, DVM, DACVIM (Large Animal).

The VCRS is pleased to be hosting its 32nd annual symposium at the New Bolton Center of the University of Pennsylvania. Our conference hotel is the Hilton Garden Inn, Kennett Square, PA.

Registration is now open. There is discounted registration for VCRS Members.


Additional Attendee Information

SYMPOSIUM INFORMATION
New Bolton Center, University of Pennsylvania
382 West Street Road, Kennett Square, PA 19348 Phone: (800) 272-6935
Get Directions || Website

HOTEL INFORMATION
Hilton Garden Inn, Kennett Square, PA
815 E Baltimore Pike, Kennett Square, PA 19348 Phone: 1 (610) 444-9100
Get Directions ||  Book Your Room

REGISTRATION INCLUDES
Continental Breakfast and Lunch Monday-Wednesday, Shuttle Service from Hotel to Meeting, and Awards Dinner on Tuesday

TRAVEL SUGGESTIONS
Closest arrival airport: Philadelphia International Airport (PHL).
Shuttle service from airport to hotel: Delaware Express www.delexpress.com


Pricing

REGISTRATION - $250

The registration fee for the full conference is $250 for both members and non-members.

STUDENT DISCOUNTED RATE - $125
RESIDENT DISCOUNTED RATE - $175

Event Information

How to Register

  1. Register Online
    http://cgi.vet.tufts.edu/ce/registration

  2. Mail Registration Form to:
    Dr. Elizabeth Rozanski, Secretary VCRS
    c/o Cummings School of Veterinary Medicine at Tufts University
    200 Westboro Road
    North Grafton, MA 01536
Online Registration
By-Mail Registration Form

2014 Symposium Program

Monday
October 27

8:15am - Posters and Breakfast
9:00am Melissa Mazan

Viral respiratory infections and IAD - the missing link?

9:50am Mary Robinson

Equine Drug Testing in the 21st century: Impact on Treating Respiratory Disease

10:40 - Break
11:00am Pam Wilkins

Evolution of mechanical ventilation of foals over the last quarter century

11:50am Lesley King

25 years of Positive Pressure Ventilation in Small Animals

12:40pm - Lunch
2:00pm *Reynold Panettieri

Asthma, novel approaches and new targets

2:50pm Laurie Kilpatrick

Protein Kinase C and the Control of Lung Inflammation in Sepsis

3:40pm - Break
4:00-5:00pm (later if necessary) Abstracts

INTERLEUKIN-17A INCREASES THE SURVIVAL OF EQUINE NEUTROPHILS - Murcia
Characterization of local and systemic leukocyte responses to respiratory Chlamydia psittaci infection in calves - Prohl
PULMONARY PHARMACOKINETICS OF DESFUROYLCEFTIOFUR ACETAMIDE AFTER NEBULIZATION OR INTRAMUSCULAR ADMINISTRATION OF CEFTIOFUR SODIUM TO WEANLING FOALS. - Fultz
DEVELOPMENT OF A QUANTITATIVE APPROACH FOR THE STUDY OF THE EQUINE LUNG: FIXATION AND SAMPLING FOR THE APPLICATION OF STEREOLOGY - Gélinas-Lymburner
DEVELOPING A DISEASE-SPECIFIC ASSAY TO IDENTIFY HIGHLY REPARATIVE MESENCHYMAL STEM CELLS - Paxson

Evening Activities

Board Meeting

Tuesday
October 28

8:15am - Posters and Breakfast
9:00am Petra Reinhold

Chlamydia infections in cattle: new insights into host-pathogen interactions and treatment options

9:50am Eleanor Hawkins

Function Testing in Unsedated Dogs with Muscular Dystrophy: experiences with the alphabet soup of ABG, TBFVL and RIP.

10:40 - Break
11:00am *Ed Morrisey

Generating and Regenerating the lung

11:50am Ross Summer

Surfactant lipid abnormalities drive the lung toward fibrosis

12:40pm - Lunch
2:00pm Abstracts

2:50pm Abstracts

LONG TERM EFFECT OF CONSECUTIVE HIGH FREQUENCY NEURO-ELECTROSTIMULATION TREATMENTS IN THE THERAPY OF THE RECURRENT AIRWAY OBSTRUCTIVE DISEASE (HEAVES) IN HORSES. - Gallastegui Menoyo
IMMUNOHISTOCHEMIAL TYROSINE HYDROXYLASE STAINING OF THE THORACIC VAGUS NERVE AND EXTENDED BRANCHES TO THE LUNG IN HORSES. - Gallastegui Menoyo
THE USE OF RECOMBINANT TISSUE PLASMINOGEN ACTIVATOR (rTPA) IN THE TREATMENT OF FIBRINOUS PLEUROPNEUMONIA IN THE HORSE: 25 CASES (2007-2012). - Tomlinson
THE EFFECT OF FIBRINOUS PLEURAL EFFUSION ON SURVIVAL AND COMPLICATIONS IN HORSES WITH PLEUROPNEUMONIA: 74 CASES (2002-2012). - Tomlinson

3:40pm - Break
4:00-5:00pm (later if necessary) Abstracts

BREATHING PATTERN AND FUNCTIONAL PARAMETERS OF UPPER AIRWAY OBSTRUCTION IN CATS RECORDED WITH BAROMETRIC WHOLE BODY PLETHYSMOGRAPHY: A PILOT STUDY - Lin
High-resolution computed tomography evaluation of the bronchial lumen to vertebral body diameter and pulmonary artery to vertebral body diameter ratios in anesthetized ventilated cats with normal lungs - Lee-Fowler
VIRAL CO-INFECTIONS IN DOGS WITH BACTERIAL PNEUMONIA - Viitanen
ACUTE AND CHRONIC NEUROKININ-1 ANTAGONISM FAIL TO DAMPEN AIRFLOW LIMITATION OR AIRWAY EOSINOPHILIA IN ASTHMATIC CATS - Grobman
DECREASING MORBIDITY ASSOCIATED WITH DIAGNOSTIC AIRWAY LAVAGE IN CATS - Bernhard

Evening Activities

Awards Dinner at Hilton Garden Inn, Kennett Square, PA

Wednesday
October 29

8:15am - Posters and Breakfast
9:00am Ray Dillon

Rethinking Feline Lung Disease: Clinical Implications of Parasitic Infections

9:50am Eric Parente

Upper Airway Dysfunction as Part of the Respiratory Equation

10:40 - Break
11:00am The Joan O'Brien Lecture: Joan Hendricks

Felines, fruitflies, bulldogs and faculty--an evolving career

11:50am James Baumgartner

V/Q Distributions and Pulmonary Drug Studies: Discovery, Efficacy, and Phenotyping

12:40pm - Lunch
2:00pm Ashley Boyle

Strangles: diagnosis and complications in the horse

2:50pm Abstracts

EVALUATION OF DIAGNOSTIC CRITERIA FOR ACUTE LUNG INJURY (ALI) AND ACUTE RESPIRATORY DISTRESS SYNDROME (ARDS) IN NEONATAL FOALS AND CRIAS - Bedenice
RELATIONSHIPS BETWEEN EQUINE AIRWAY REACTIVITY MEASURED BY FLOWMETRIC PLETHYSMOGRAPHY AND SPECIFIC INDICATORS OF AIRWAY INFLAMMATION - Wichtel
EXAMINING THE BACTERIAL BURDEN OF THE EQUINE RESPIRATORY TRACT - Ivester
PILOT EVALUATION OF 25-HYDROXYVITAMIN D LEVELS IN PUPPIES WITH COMMUNITY-ACQUIRED PNEUMONIA - Rosanski

3:40pm - Break

Pulmonary Pharmacology: Speakers 2014*

October 27–29th 2014 / Kennett Square, PA

* Schedule And Speakers Subject To Change

Generating And Regenerating The Lung

Dr. Ed Morrisey, Ph.D
Professor of Medicine and Cell and Developmental Biology
Scientific Director, Penn Institute for Regenerative Medicine

Edward E. Morrisey, Ph.D. is a Professor of Medicine and Cell and Developmental Biology at the University of Pennsylvania and is the Scientific Director of the Penn Institute for Regenerative Medicine. Dr. Morrisey is an international expert on pulmonary and cardiovascular development and regeneration. The focus of his lab is on defining the mechanisms underlying lung and cardiac development and how these can be harnessed to improve repair and regeneration in these tissues. The ultimate goal is to better understand how signaling and epigenetic pathways regulate cardiopulmonary development and regeneration, which may lead to the development of novel therapeutic approaches for lung and cardiac diseases. He is a member of several NIH research consortia related to stem cell and regenerative biology including the Progenitor Cell Biology Consortium-PCBC, The Lung Repair and Regeneration Consortium-LRRC (of which he is the Steering Committee Chair), and the Next-Gen iPSC Consortium. He is also a past Associate Editor for the Journal of Clinical Investigation.

Asthma, Novel Approaches & New Targets 1h

Reynold A. Panettieri, Jr., MD

Dr Panettieri is the Robert L. Mayock and David A. Cooper Professor of Medicine ate Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania and is the director of the Airways Biology Initiative Research, an adjunct Professor at the Wistar Institute, and Deputy Director of the Center of Excellence in Environmental Toxicology. His research interests are in smooth muscle biology, airway remodeling, respiratory pharmacology and physiology.

V/Q Distributions And Pulmonary Drug Studies: Discovery, Efficacy, And Phenotyping 1h

Dr. James E. Baumgardner

Dr James Baumgartner is the director of Oscillogy®, a small business devoted to the manufacturing of equipment and instruments for physiology research, with a primary emphasis on pulmonary physiology. A privately held Pennsylvania company, Oscillogy has been operating in the Philadelphia area since its founding in 2003. Prior to this position, Dr. James E. Baumgardner was a practicing anesthesiologist in an academic setting, as well as a basic scientist exploring pulmonary physiology and pathophysiology.

Surfactant lipid abnormalities drive the lung toward fibrosis

Ross Summer, MD
Thomas Jefferson University Hospital

Dr. Ross Summer is a board certified pulmonary and critical care physician and an NIH-funded investigator. Dr. Summer graduated medical school at Louisiana State University in New Orleans and completed his internship and medical residency training at Johns Hopkins Hospital in Baltimore, Maryland. After completing a four-year pulmonary and critical care fellowship at Boston University he remained on faculty for eight years prior to being recruited to Thomas Jefferson University in Philadelphia in 2012. Dr. Summer is currently an Associate Professor of Medicine and he maintains an active laboratory and clinical practice. Dr. Summer's laboratory focuses on lung metabolism and understanding how local and systemic metabolic derangements contribute to the onset and progression of lung diseases such as Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome (ARDS) and Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis (IPF).

Chlamydia Infections In Cattle: New Insights Into Host-Pathogen Interactions And Treatment Options

Petra Reinhold

Petra Reinhold received her Doctor of Veterinary Medicine from the University of Leipzig, Germany in 1984, followed by a PhD in Veterinary Science from the University of Liege, Belgium for her work to develop oscillometric pulmonary mechanical measurement systems for domestic animals. Professor Reinhold teaches respiratory physiology in the veterinary professional curriculum at the Free University of Berlin, Germany. In the Federal Research Institute for Animal Health (‘Friedrich-Loeffler-Institut'), she is Head of the Department ‘Pathology and Pathophysiology' at Institute of Molecular Pathogenesis. Her professional activities include validation of new techniques for assessing the pulmonary function, the gas exchange, and pulmonary inflammatory mediators in healthy animals, in experimentally infected animals and in animals under treatment. Her research group has been instrumental in the pathophysiological characterization of infectious diseases of the respiratory tract of domestic animals.

Acute lung injury and the use of Protein Kinase C delta inhibitors as potential therapeutics

Laurie Kilpatrick, MD, PhD
Temple University School of Medicine

Dr. Laurie Kilpatrick is a cell biologist/immunologist with a long-standing interest in inflammatory processes involved in host tissue damage, particularly those involving damage to the lung. She received her PhD from the University of Pennsylvania where she also did a Post Doctoral Fellowship. She is currently an Associate Professor of Physiology at Temple University School of Medicine and holds faculty appointments in the Center for Inflammation, Translational and Clinical Lung Research and the Thrombosis Research Center. A major focus of her research is investigating molecular mechanisms regulating pro-inflammatory signaling in the innate immune system; particularly the role of activated neutrophils in vascular inflammation and the development of lung injury. An important focus is the regulation of neutrophil: endothelial interaction and the control of neutrophil migration into the lung. She has identified Protein Kinase C-delta (PKC-δ) as a critical regulator of the inflammatory response in the lung and is studying the use of directed anti-PKCδ therapy to the lung for the treatment of acute lung injury in a rat model of sepsis.

Felines, fruitflies, bulldogs and faculty--an evolving career

Joan Hendricks, VMD, PhD

Dr. Hendricks is the Gilbert S. Kahn Dean of the School of Veterinary Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania and a diplomate of the American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine. Dean Hendricks has served as a member of the PennVet faculty for more than 20 years. In 2001 she became the first woman named to an endowed professorship at the school when she was named the Henry and Corinne R. Bower Professor of Small Animal Medicine. In addition to serving as chief of critical care in the Department of Clinical Studies at Philadelphia, Dean Hendricks is founding director of the Veterinary Clinical Investigation Center (VCIC) at the school and holds a secondary appointment as professor in the Department of Medicine at Penn Medicine. During her sabbatical year, Dean Hendricks chose to investigate how molecular biology could be applied to neuroscience, specifically to the field of sleep and sleep disorders, in which she is a recognized expert. In 1979 and 1980, Dean Hendricks earned her VMD and PhD from Penn. She also carried out her residency and postdoctoral fellowship at the university. She has a BS in biology and psychology from Yale University.

Function Testing In Unsedated Dogs With Muscular Dystrophy: Experiences With The Alphabet Soup Of ABG, TBFVL And RIP 1h

Eleanor Hawkins, DVM

Dr. Hawkins earned her DVM from The Ohio State University. She completed and internship at the Animal Medical Center, New York City, and a residency at the University of California, Davis. She was on faculty at Purdue University before moving, in 1991, to NC State. She is the author of more than 60 refereed publications and more than 175 proceedings. She is the author of the respiratory section of Nelson and Couto's Small Animal Internal Medicine textbook, and has been respiratory section editor of Current Veterinary Therapy and the 5-Minute Veterinary Consult. She has served as the Chair of the Board of Regents of the American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine (ACVIM), President of the ACVIM, and President of the Specialty of Small Animal Internal Medicine, and on the Board of the Veterinary Comparative Respiratory Society, among other professional leadership positions. Within the University, she is the Assistant Department Head for Small Animal Internal Medicine and Emergency/Critical Care Service, and she is the Section Leader of the Oncology Service. She was named a distinguished alumnus of the Animal Medical Center. Her clinical, research, and teaching interest is in respiratory diseases of dogs and cats.

Viral respiratory infections and IAD - the missing link?

Melissa Mazan, DVM

Education - Yale University 1983, Tufts University School of Veterinary Medicine 1993, Dilettante, 1984-1987. Current position: Associate Professor and Large Animal Section Head. Research Interests - pulmonary function, etiology of IAD, environment and airway inflammation. Teaching interests: videoconference for long-distance education, veterinary curriculum development in developing countries, ambulatory practice in developing countries

25 Years Of Positive Pressure Ventilation In Small Animals

Lesley King, VMD

Dr Lesley King graduated from the Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, University College Dublin, Ireland, in 1986. At the School of Veterinary Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, she completed a residency in small animal internal medicine in 1989. Following the residency, Dr King remained on staff in the Intensive Care Unit at the University of Pennsylvania, and she is currently a Professor in the Section of Critical Care, and the Director of the Intensive Care Unit. She is a Diplomate of the American College of Veterinary Emergency and Critical Care and the American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine. Dr King's research interests include all aspects of small animal intensive care medicine, with special emphasis on pulmonary medicine and outcome prediction in the critical small animal patient. In 2001 she received the ACVECC Scientific Achievement Award for advancing the understanding of acute lung injury and implementation of ventilator management in veterinary medicine; in 2006 she received the Bourgelat Award from the BSAVA, which is their primary international recognition of outstanding contributions to the field of small animal practice; in 2012 she was awarded the University of Pennsylvania's Christian R. and Mary F. Lindback Foundation Award for Distinguished Teaching; and in 2013 she received the Jack Mara Scientific Achievement Award from ACVECC for advancing our understanding of respiratory physiology in critical care medicine, and the Ira Zaslow Distinguished Service Award from VECCS.

Equine Drug Testing in the 21st century: Impact on Treating Respiratory Disease

Mary Robinson, VMD, PhD

Dr. Mary Robinson graduated from Penn Vet's Veterinary Medical Scientist Training Program in 2010 with a Veterinary Medical Degree and a PhD in Pharmacological Sciences, and completed a post-doctoral fellowship sponsored by the Racing Medication and Testing Consortium with Dr. Lawrence Soma at Penn Vet's New Bolton Center. She is the Co-director of the Penn Vet Equine Pharmacology Laboratory, and she has recently been appointed the Acting Director of the Pennsylvania Equine Toxicology and Research Laboratory, which performs forensic analysis on plasma and urine samples collected from horses racing in the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania. Simultaneously, Dr. Robinson designed and is currently completing the requirements for an alternative track residency program with the American College of Veterinary Clinical Pharmacology under the mentorship of Dr. Eden Bermingham at the Center for Veterinary Medicine within the Food and Drug Administration. Her primary research interests are drugs with the potential to enhance athletic performance with a focus on drugs affecting oxygen uptake, transport, and delivery to exercising muscle.

The Effect Of Upper Airway Abnormalities On The Lower Airways

Eric Parente
DVM from Cornell. Residency in Surgery at New Bolton Center and Diplomate ACVS. Currently Professor of Surgery New Bolton Center

Evolution of mechanical ventilation of foals over the last quarter century

Pamela Wilkins
D.V.M., Cornell University ; M.S., Cornell University ; Ph.D., Cornell University (Physiology); Diplomate, American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine; Diplomate, American College of Veterinary Emergency and Critical Care

Rethinking Feline Lung Disease: Clinical Implications of Parasitic Infections

Ray Dillon, DVM, MS, MBA
Auburn University

Dr. Ray Dillon is the Jack O Rash Professor of Medicine in Department of Clinical Sciences at Auburn University. After receiving his DVM from Texas A&M University in 1973 Magma Cum Laude, he was an intern and clinical resident at Auburn University earning his MS in Internal Medicine in 1977. He was board certified in the American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine in 1979. He received a MBA Degree in 2001 from Auburn University. Dr. Dillon was Head of the Section of Medicine for over 20 years and was Interim Director of the Scott-Ritchey Research Center. Dr. Dillon has over numerous scientific publications and scientific presentations, many at international forums. Dr. Dillon is active in teaching internal medicine to the veterinary professional students and graduate students/residents, and receives referral cases at the Auburn University Teaching Hospital.

He has been active in cardiopulmonary research, with an emphasis on inflammatory lung disease and molecular mechanisms in myocardial remodeling of dogs and cats. In addition to his clinical duties, he has been directly associated with over 20 million dollars of research over the past 15 years including collaborative research with University of Alabama at Birmingham Heart Failure Center.

Strangles: diagnosis and complications in the horse

Ashley Boyle

Ashley Boyle obtained her BA from Smith College in 1996 and her DVM from Cornell University in 2000. She did an internship at Littleton Equine Medical and Surgical Center in Colorado and obtained her Diplomacy in Large Animal Internal Medicine after completing her residency at UCDAVIS in 2004. She is an assistant professor at New Bolton Center, University of PA, School of Veterinary Medicine in the Section of Field Service. Her research focus is in infectious disease. She has been currently studying Streptococcus equi subsp equi and the testing methods associated with disease to help improve herd management and the practicality of identifying infected and carrier animals.

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